ChickenSoup

Chicken Soup - april 19 2013

Did you read the New York Times piece on the science of junk food from a few weeks back? I did, and it left me feeling outraged and insulted. While I’ve know for years that processed foods taste different than homemade foods, often aren’t as healthy and require resource intensive packaging, I’d never fully realized just how much effort goes in to manipulating me and my family into buying these things. And the worst part? It is all done under the guise of helping out with our busy lives and giving us better food options, when the real reason is none other than to increase the profits of businesses.

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CobbSaladDip

Super Bowl Cobb Salad Dip - february 3, 2013

Yes, the Super Bowl is today and our home team is playing!  So of course we have to bring something to the party. This one is really quick, really unhealthy and really delicious. Best of all, the recipe is short enough to fit into a tweet, which I received from @CHOW last week.

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Kohlrabi

Three Cheers for Kohlrabi! - november 20, 2011

Kohlrabi is something I remember from my childhood. My mother presented it to us, my brother, sister, and I, in the kitchen. A strange, alien form she found either at the grocery store or in her garden. It was not purple then, but a pale greeny white, as though it might taste minty or sweet like a honeydew melon. She peeled it, cut it into cubes and then served it up with toothpicks. 

"It's delicious!" she announced, slurping her lips to let us know of her love for the thing. 

But it was not minty, or sweet. Maybe a little bit refreshing, in a watery sort of way, with a strong whiff of broccoli. Finding it all around objectionable, the three of us squealed in horror and ran out into the yard, never to touch kohlrabi again.

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SpicyAsianSlaw
 
Spicy Asian Slaw - february 26, 2011

In the past couple of weeks we have eaten at least five cabbages. Winter, or spring in some places, is cabbage season. They are beautiful in the garden, gathering dew with dusty hues of plum, pale and bright green. And they are great in salads of all sorts, stir fried and steamed. But sometimes I'm just not sure what to do with them all.

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ChoppedSalad
Mark Bittman's Chopped Salad - january 16, 2011

Last year I received Mark Bittman’s How to Cook Everything for my birthday, from a dear friend. It is a big and impressive book and because of its heft and lack of fancy photographs, I lumped it into the same go-to-first category that Irma Rombauer’s Joy of Cooking and Deborah Madison’s Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone occupy at my house.

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Carrots

Kindergarten Carrots - september 2, 2010

Last night I spent ten minutes scrubbing and trimming thirty carrots, as part of a monthly snack contribution to my daughter's kindergarten class. I know nearly all kids love carrots, and I know they especially love those so called "baby" carrots, but I cannot stand those little nubs. I'm not terribly concerned about the health risk of the chlorinated water they are dipped into, but I do get peeved at their false claims, especially since they mislead people into thinking they are not a processed food, which they are. Minimally processed, sure, but it upsets the purist in me. Fakers.

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TomatoTart

Tomato Tart and a Little Gem Salad - july 28, 2010

The week we left San Francisco for Tucson, this summer's volume of Canal House Cooking arrived with the mail. You may already know this, but Canal House is my new favorite thing. Besides Nigel Slater, of course. I love its irreverence toward normal day to day life - for those at the Canal House, everything revolves around food. I also love its quick vignettes: trout from a friend of a friend fishing outside the window, a whole essay on why their pal likes to get a buzz on and a few words about Patricia Curtan (illustrator of Chez Panisse Vegetables) and her apricot jam.

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MietteCake

Birthday Crab Rolls - july 2, 2010

My daughter turned five years old yesterday, and what a celebration it was. She had presents from her Grandparents in the morning , singing and candle blowing with a fake cake at school in the afternoon, then dinner with real cake and more presents in the evening. Tomorrow she has another birthday bash (to which we seem to have invited over seventy guests) and still more presents arriving in the mail from her other Grandmother.

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SesameTofu

Sesame Ginger Tofu with Greens - june 3, 2010

This is another old favorite from Deborah Madison that my husband and I have been making for years. We've tried many variations of the sauce, and often I'll make it without marinating the tofu ahead of time, simply because I don't get around to mixing it up before I need to cook dinner. Even then it is delicious. Often it serves as an end of the week produce clean up, just about any vegetable can go in, clearing out the fridge for our incoming Eatwell box. I've made it with pretty much every sort of green we've had - stir fry mix, spinach, chard, kale, mustard (one of my favorites, with a simplified marinade). It is good with turnips, broccoli, cauliflower, always snap peas if we have them and sometimes carrots, though I can usually find a better use for those.

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BloodOranges

Polenta and Blood Orange Sorbet - may 9, 2010

Polenta is a rather intensive affair, when cooked at home from dry crunchy grit. The traditional recipe calls for near continuous stirring, for half an hour to fourty-five minutes. Deborah Madison offers a more modern walk-away version, but it needs to sit in a double boiler for an hour and a half, after two separate pots of water are brought to a boil, one at a time, on top of each other, all before the grit even comes into play. At my house, a cooking time that long and with that many steps could only be accomplished with very well orchestrated planning, which is not my forte.

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